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Mount Carmel Catholic Primary School

I have come so that they may have life and have it to the full - John 10:10

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'A very warm welcome to Mount Carmel Catholic School's website. At the heart of Mount Carmel is our very strong Catholic Ethos. We aim for every child to leave here as an ambassador of Christ. Working parallel to this is our drive for high standards. Through creating a supportive and nurturing school, children really have a passion for learning. We hope you feel this from looking around our website.'
'A very warm welcome to Mount Carmel Catholic School's website. At the heart of Mount Carmel is our very strong Catholic Ethos. We aim for every child to leave here as an ambassador of Christ. Working parallel to this is our drive for high standards. Through creating a supportive and nurturing school, children really have a passion for learning. We hope you feel this from looking around our website.'

Mental Health and Wellbeing

Do you have a worry and you want to get in touch with Louise? Maybe you just feel a little unsure about something and you want a chat? Sometimes the littlest worry can grow and grow. It's good to share these worries with someone that you can trust. 

Please click on the star below to get in touch with Louise, our 'Space Lady'. Fill in the form or you could fill out a slip (you have these  in your classroom) and post it into one of the red boxes. Remember, Louise is in school every Friday if you want a chat but maybe you could speak to another adult that you trust as well? The grown-ups in school are here to listen to you and they will help as much as they can.

Parents, you can fill in the form if you have a worry, Louise is in school on Friday. 

Online Coffee Morning 30th April 2021

21st April 2021

 

Hello to you all. Please find a message from Louise, below.

 

LEARNING and WANTING to do the right thing.

Children develop their ‘inner compass’ every day. They learn what they live, primarily by the example you set and the family culture that you create.

How can parents help?

The most powerful way to teach a child a skill is to model it. When you treat others (including your child) with respect, when you apologise and when you regulate your emotions- then your child learns to do the same. Her inner compass will take shape from yours. In addition, your child constantly needs to make difficult choices so instead of telling him off and shaming him for making a “poor” choice, use it as an opportunity to develop that compass: help him reflect on how he feels and explain that we are all tempted to take the easy way over the right way: we are not perfect, but we can do better. In order to help your child, WANT to do the right thing, make sure your limits are reasonable and age-appropriate. Set them up for success so that they can feel good about being a person who does the right thing. Finally, help your child repair relationships following any damage and remember to stay connected: when your child feels you are on their side, they are more likely to WANT to follow your lead.

Sometimes we could all do with someone to talk to.  If you would like to meet Louise for a confidential and non-judgemental chat about you, your child, or any other worries, she is available on Fridays 9-10am. You can call/text Louise on 07582310756 or email her at lalltimes.307@lgflmail.org  

 

 

31st March 2021

 

A message from Louise

 

Holiday Survival Guide

Breaks from school can actually feel quite stressful for children, especially with all the disruption to the start of the year and their regular schedules and routines are again disrupted. As we head into a longer holiday, here are some tips on how to minimise the tears and maximise the joy at home.

How can parents help?

As always with parenting, it is most important to look after yourself first. Make sure your own cup isn’t full so you can stay calm. You can also let them know in advance what they will be doing over the holiday and remind them again every morning the plans for that day. Many children will also do better if you keep to some routine and schedule every day, to offer them some predictability. If you can, always include some outdoor or physical activity every day as it helps them to stay regulated. Finally, remember to do less and connect more!

Sometimes we could all do with someone to talk to.  If you would like to meet Louise for a confidential and non-judgemental chat about you, your child, or any other worries, she is available on Fridays 9-10am. You can call/text Louise on 07582310756 or email her at lalltimes.307@lgflmail.org

26th March 2021

 

A message from Louise...

 

Things to know about saying ‘NO’ to your child

We all wish our children would just comply when we ask them to do something. However, we all know that really isn’t always the case! Thankfully, it is possible to help children want to cooperate without resorting to yelling, threats or harshness.

How can parents help?

The most important thing to remember is that children only listen to us because of who we are to them. So be sure to keep strengthening your relationship: consciously connect with them before giving them a direction. You can also try to transform it into something fun and inviting! Kids will accept your limit when you first accept their feelings about your limits (sadness, anger, disappointment,…). Finally, children follow our requests when they feel they have some control in the situation: avoid power struggles by giving them a choice and some autonomy.

Sometimes we could all do with someone to talk to.  If you would like to meet Louise for a confidential and non-judgemental chat about you, your child, or any other worries, she is available on Fridays 9-10am. You can call/text Louise on 07582310756 or email her at lalltimes.307@lgflmail.org

19th March 2021

 

Message from Louise

 

Nurturing Family Connection: Dinner

Often, dinner can feel like such a chore, even a mission, that you just want to get through. However, studies show that having dinner together as a family is a top predictor for how well children will do in school and in adolescence. The ritual of sharing food with those we love offers children the security of belonging, being nurtured and a space to talk and share.

How can parents help?

Try to have at least a few nights a week when you can all eat together. Keep that space sacred, safe and positive and, most importantly, switch off the TV and all devices- including your own phones! It is helpful to keep dinner fun and playful and to engage everyone in preparing the meal and/or setting the table. Think of rituals you can put in place and try to make the discussions interesting for everyone. And the first secret is to keep the food healthy but simple: look after yourself and save your energy for connecting with your family.

 

Sometimes we could all do with someone to talk to.  If you would like to meet Louise for a confidential and non-judgemental chat about you, your child, or any other worries, she is available on Fridays 9-10am. You can call/text Louise on 07582310756 or email her at lalltimes.307@lgflmail.org

12th March 2021

 

A message from Louise...

 

Help your child build Emotional Intelligence


Returning to school some children can find it difficult to pick up from where they left off especially with friendships. It might feel like starting all over again or coming back into a welcoming group of friends, others may struggle to get along or to find other kids who share their interests. Some children have or make a best friend, some wish they could. Here’s a few things to help your child with their social skills and work through issues with friends or peers.
How parents can help:


Listen when he has peer challenges, which all kids do. If you tell him what to do, you imply that he is incompetent, and you aren't helping him learn. Instead, help him to clarify his feelings, and to problem solve
the issue.


Don't take sides when she fights with her friends. Listen to her views and empathize with her feelings but resist the impulse to demonize the other child. If you suspect that your child is being unfair, try wondering with her about the other child's point of view, but again be careful not to blame your child


Help her learn how to express her needs without attacking the other person. This is a challenge for all of us, so kids need our guidance, and to practice.


Make it a habit to acknowledge and reflect feelings instead of dismissing them. Often, we parents have such a hard time seeing our child in pain that we get angry at the other child. We say things like: "He's not a good friend to you. Let it go and find a new friend. Good riddance!" But that doesn't help the child at all. Comments that tell our kids to just get over someone they've cared about, or a hurt they've suffered, simply dismiss our child's legitimate feelings and keep the child stuck in hurt and anger. When you instead keep your own upset in check and empathize with your child's feelings: "Having your friend say something like that to you could really hurt." he gets to feel them fully. That might mean he gets more upset momentarily, but once he gets a chance to feel the emotions, they begin to dissipate. Once he feels better, he can do better problem-solving, whether that means talking with the friend, or ending the friendship.


Help him to think through various problem-solving options. Often, once kids work through their feelings, they know what action to take. “I’m not mad at Sam anymore and I miss playing with him. I’m going to knock on his door.” But if he doesn’t, help him brainstorm. Sometimes he'll need help from you to know how to say no in a way that keeps both his friend and his integrity.


If your child is having a hard time, consider what kind of support will help. For instance, some children
don't pick up on social cues and need help to learn specific skills, like how to join a group. Others don't listen to their friend's ideas, or physically get into each other's space. Observe your child as he or she plays with another child and see if you can pinpoint what is going wrong. Later, without blame or shame, act out a similar scenario with stuffed animals and ask your child what the characters should do. Make it funny to defuse any tension. Reading books about social skills with your child can also be very helpful, as long as your child feels you're partnering with her to support her, rather than trying to "fix" her. There are some good books for kids available online.


Sometimes we could all do with someone to talk to. If you would like to meet Louise for a confidential and non-judgemental chat about you, your child, or any other worries, she is available on Fridays 9-10am. You can call/text Louise on 07582310756 or email her at lalltimes.307@lgflmail.org

Children's Mental Health Week     

1st-7th February 2021

 

This years theme is 'Express Yourself'. How do you 'Express Yourself'? 

 

Expressing yourself is about finding ways to share feelings, thoughts, or ideas, through creativity. This could be through art, music, writing and poetry, dance and drama, photography and film, and doing activities that make you feel good.

It’s important to remember that being able to express yourself is not about being the best at something or putting on a performance for others. It is about finding a way to show who you are, and how you see the world, that can help you feel good about yourself.

 

Below are videos, suggested activities that you may wish to complete at home. There is no need to share them with school, do them for yourself. If you want to share your activities with others share them with your friends and family.  We will touch on this theme once we are all back in school again, this will give you an opportunity for children to share with their friends in school . The videos have links to YouTube so children please watch with a grown-up. 

 

Louise our Space Lady (from Ealing Schools Counselling Partnership) has created a video for us to share. It's been broken down into smaller chunks and it will be added to Class Dojos, during this week.

Videos from Louise - our Space Lady

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Louise has prepared a video talking about 'Children's Mental Heath Week' and the theme 'Express Yourself'. It has been broken down into smaller pieces and will be shared through the week. If you want to share some of your work, please add to Class Dojo's (put 'for Louise-Express Yourself'-Louise will look through on Friday) but there will be a chance to share work when we touch on this again, when we are all back in school.

Part 2-message from Louise

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Part 3 from Louise

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Part 4 from Louise

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Part 5 from Louise

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Children's Mental Health Week for Parents/Carers. These are suggested activities and there is no pressure to complete them.

Resources for Parents
#Encourage, Challenge and Support.#
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