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Mount Carmel Catholic Primary School

I have come so that they may have life and have it to the full - John 10:10

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'A very warm welcome to Mount Carmel Catholic School's website. At the heart of Mount Carmel is our very strong Catholic Ethos. We aim for every child to leave here as an ambassador of Christ. Working parallel to this is our drive for high standards. Through creating a supportive and nurturing school, children really have a passion for learning. We hope you feel this from looking around our website.'
'A very warm welcome to Mount Carmel Catholic School's website. At the heart of Mount Carmel is our very strong Catholic Ethos. We aim for every child to leave here as an ambassador of Christ. Working parallel to this is our drive for high standards. Through creating a supportive and nurturing school, children really have a passion for learning. We hope you feel this from looking around our website.'

Mental Health and Wellbeing

Do you have a worry and you want to get in touch with Louise? Maybe you just feel a little unsure about something and you want a chat? Sometimes the littlest worry can grow and grow. It's good to share these worries with someone that you can trust. 

Please click on the star below to get in touch with Louise, our 'Space Lady'. Fill in the form or you could fill out a slip (you have these  in your classroom) and post it into one of the red boxes. Remember, Louise is in school every Friday if you want a chat but maybe you could speak to another adult that you trust as well? The grown-ups in school are here to listen to you and they will help as much as they can.

Parents, you can fill in the form if you have a worry, Louise is in school on Friday. 

9th July 2021

 

A message from Louise...

 

What are your biggest strengths as a parent?

If someone observed you as a parent, what would they admire if they could watch your best moments with your child(ren)? Make a list of all the things you are most proud of- even if they seem small and simple. Also include those not-so-great moments that you have been able to notice and turn around.

Now let’s build on those strengths…

Read through your list and give yourself credit and appreciation for all your hard work. Now think of what it is that helps you be your personal best as a parent: what support could help you be that parent more often and how can you give this support to yourself every day? Next, notice when you act in a way with your child that makes you feel good about yourself and do a little celebratory dance, or give yourself a high five! Appreciating yourself will help you be your best self-more often and will also help you enjoy parenting even more.

Sometimes we could all do with someone to talk to. If you would like to meet Louise for a confidential and non-judgemental chat about you, your child, or any other worries, she is available on Fridays 9-10am. You can call/text Louise on 07582310756 or email her at lalltimes.307@lgflmail.org

For parents whose child is struggling with anxiety, here are some ways you can support them in those moments and places you can get help.

30th June 2021

 

Please find below a message from Louise

 

Have you made mistakes as a parent?

We all have difficult times when we know we are messing up. Sometimes, we get triggered and we forget to see things from our child's perspective. So we lose it, react to their behaviours and can later be left filled with remorse. As this is a particularly busy time of year for many, we can easily feel more stressed, which makes it more difficult to practice patience and calm when faced with challenging behaviours. It is helpful to remind ourselves that most things can be repaired.

 

How can parents help?

Parenting is hard and we are only human- which means that your child doesn't need you to be perfect. In fact, what they need from you is the space to be imperfect too, and to be loved and accepted for who they are. Luckily, we can model how to repair: "I'm so sorry I yelled at you... You don't ever deserve to be yelled at. Let's rewind and try again. Here is what I meant to say..." As long as our ruptures are followed by reconnection and outweighed by positive moments, they become learning opportunities for our children.

 

Sometimes we could all do with someone to talk to. If you would like to meet Louise for a confidential and non-judgemental chat about you, your child, or any other worries, she is available on Fridays 9-10am. You can call/text Louise on 07582310756 or email her at lalltimes.307@lgflmail.org

23rd June 2021

 

A message from Louise

 

Supporting your child who worries in social situations

 

Many children can be described as “shy”. Often, what this can mean is that they are very sensitive to their environment and can easily feel overwhelmed; perhaps they are introverted, meaning that they need quiet time away from people to renew their energy; or maybe they get so absorbed in their play and ideas that they aren’t so interested in interacting with others.

 

How can parents help?

Firstly, try to avoid labelling your child as “shy”, as he may think there is something wrong with him. Instead, be sure to stay sensitive to his needs and empathise with what he is finding difficult. You can point out that she is able to overcome her fears: take the time to coach her on how to make friends and how to express her needs to others. Let him know that it is normal for everyone to feel a little uncomfortable when they first meet someone or walk into a room full of people and brainstorm together ways that he can overcome his worries in these situations. Remember to empower your child and avoid being over-protective. Instead, after validating her feelings, let her know that she is capable of doing hard things

Sometimes we could all do with someone to talk to. If you would like to meet Louise for a confidential and non-judgemental chat about you, your child, or any other worries, she is available on Fridays 9-10am. You can call/text Louise on 07582310756 or email her at lalltimes.307@lgflmail.org

16th June 2021

 

A message from Louise

 

Questions to ask after school- instead of ‘What did you do today?’

Do you ever wish you could be a fly on the wall at your child’s school? As a parent, sending your child to school can bring up all sorts of feelings. More than anything, you may be feeling curious: what did they do? How did they behave? How do they act when you are not there? And many of you may also have realised that asking your child ‘How was your day?” doesn’t always encourage them to share their experiences.

How can parents help?

Give them some time before asking them lots of questions at pick-up: they may be tired and will need to reconnect with you first. Try to chat casually and to ask open-ended questions. If they aren’t ready to answer, just pause and come back to it later: perhaps as you are playing, eating together or during bath time. Here are a few examples of questions you can ask instead:

1. What was the funniest/silliest thing that happened today?

2. What games did you play in the playground?

3. Did anyone do anything super nice for you? What was the kindest thing you did for someone else?

4. How would you rate your day on a scale of 1-10?

5. What is something you would have liked to do differently today?

6. What made you smile today?

7. Which rule was the hardest to follow?

8. Did you make a new friend today? What’s their name? What do you like about them?

9. Is there anything you would like help with?

10. If you were a teacher/head of the school, what would your class/school be like

Sometimes we could all do with someone to talk to. If you would like to meet Louise for a confidential and non-judgemental chat about you, your child, or any other worries, she is available on Fridays 9-10am. You can call/text Louise on 07582310756 or email her at lalltimes.307@lgflmail.org

10th June 2021

 

A message from Louise

 

Bad Dreams and Nightmares

We all have nightmares, and we know how distressing they can feel. When a child has a bad dream, he is expressing a fear of something he is trying to cope with in life. Your best response is reassurance and letting him know he is safe. However, reoccurring nightmares are an indication that he may be stuck trying to resolve something difficult.

How can parents help?

Listen to your child’s dream and reassure her with empathy. You can also encourage her to act out or draw her dream with the outcome she would have liked: she gets to re-write the script. This will re-empower her and help her feel triumphant. To avoid bad dreams, limit TV and screen time and make sure your child feels it is OK to express their feelings: the angry monster may indicate that your child is afraid of their own anger. Help him understand that everyone gets angry sometimes and help him manage his feelings so that everyone stays safe. Try to create calming evening routines filled with cuddles, laughter and time spent together.

Sometimes we could all do with someone to talk to. If you would like to meet Louise for a confidential and non-judgemental chat about you, your child, or any other worries, she is available on Fridays 9-10am. You can call/text Louise on 07582310756 or email her at lalltimes.307@lgflmail.org

Stuck for something to do over half term? See the attached for fun activity ideas, around Ealing

21st May 2021 A Social Media Guide for Parents. Talking to your child about the internet and social media.

21st May 2021

 

A message from Louise

 

Parent Coffee Morning online

Covid Overwhelm – Rescheduled Wednesday 26th May 10:15 – 11:30am

It has been a different year for all of us and difficult in lots of ways, Covid, financial difficulties, loss of loved ones, social impacts, life itself and all that it brings. Sometimes it can be helpful to have a space to share that with others and just realise how much has happened and how it may have affected you and your children.

I will be running a short workshop to look at and discuss the ways in which we can support ourselves, our children and managing the overwhelm from the past year.

Join me on the above date for this time to reflect, discuss and interact on how to look after our own and our children’s wellbeing, helping them to learn and be happier at home and school.

If you would like to know more about it, then please contact me on any of the contact details below, if not please use the below Zoom link to join

Join Zoom Meeting

https://zoom.us/j/93208344365?pwd=YkVIdWRZOHRsY1hGdW9LUmd2M3RyQT09

Meeting ID: 932 0834 4365

Passcode: 7RucDw

 

Sometimes we could all do with someone to talk to.  If you would like to meet Louise for a confidential and non-judgemental chat about you, your child, or any other worries, she is available on Fridays 9-10am. You can call/text Louise on 07582310756 or email her at lalltimes.307@lgflmail.org  

13th May 2021

 

A message from Louise

 

Parent Coffee Morning Online

Covid Overwhelm – Wednesday 19th May 10 – 11:30am

It has been a different year for all of us and difficult in lots of ways, Covid, financial difficulties, loss of loved ones, social impacts, life itself and all that it brings. Sometimes it can be helpful to have a space to share that with others and just realise how much has happened and how it may have affected you and your children.

I will be running a short workshop to look at and discuss the ways in which we can support ourselves, our children and managing the overwhelm from the past year.

Join me on the above date for this time to reflect, discuss and interact on how to look after our own and our children’s wellbeing, helping them to learn and be happier at home and school.

If you would like to know more about it and to book on, then please contact me on any of the contact details below and I shall send the zoom link out to you.

Sometimes we could all do with someone to talk to.  If you would like to meet Louise for a confidential and non-judgemental chat about you, your child, or any other worries, she is available on Fridays 9-10am. You can call/text Louise on 07582310756 or email her at lalltimes.307@lgflmail.org  

7th May 2021

 

A message form Louise...

 

When you argue in front of your children

Conflict is a part of every human relationship, which means that arguments between adults may sometimes come up in front of children especially with heightened feelings and limited space from the lockdowns, or the feeling of being on top of each other. When they hear angry yelling, studies have shown that their stress hormones shoot up and can take some time to diminish. Naturally, since a child’s parent is their source of security, they feel scared when they seem out of control. Their fear can often turn into anxiety or misbehaviour and some children may think that yelling is the grown-up way of resolving conflict. 

How can parents help?

It is great for children to see healthy and respectful disagreements between adults. Therefore, try to model listening to the other person’s needs without making them feel they are wrong. What is even more healthy is for the child to see you repair and reconnect quickly. It is a good idea to come up with a code word or signal with your partner in advance, so that when one of you starts to feel particularly triggered, you know to take a pause and continue later, away from the children.

Sometimes we could all do with someone to talk to.  If you would like to meet Louise for a confidential and non-judgemental chat about you, your child, or any other worries, she is available on Fridays 9-10am. You can call/text Louise on 07582310756 or email her at lalltimes.307@lgflmail.org  

 

 

30th April 2021

 

A message from Louise

 

Children and anxiety…

All children feel anxious and worried at times. This is a normal part of their development, as they learn to develop survival strategies when faced with challenges. They are often more likely to show you their anxiety in different ways: tummy aches, needing lots of cuddles and reassurance, struggling to go to sleep, loss of appetite, fidgety/finding it hard to settle, are some examples. Anxiety in children tends to be more prevalent around night-time, changes/transitions/separation from you or around exam time in school.

How can parents help?

Talk to your child about anxiety and help them understand what is happening in their body. “Hey Warrior” is a wonderful picture book that can help you with this. Help them recognise the signs so they can tell when they are feeling anxious and can ask for help.

Explain that this feeling will pass, like a wave that peaks before it gets smaller. When their worries creep up, help them take deep breaths and do this together. Sometimes a cuddle can also help to soothe. Invite them to find a safe, happy place in their mind they can go to when feeling anxious. Your child can either keep a Worry Book where they can write or draw anxious thoughts or put them into a Worry Box. Exercise and movement, as well as a healthy diet, will help to reduce the stress hormones in their bodies. It is also important to keep your child away from violent or scary content on screens. Finally, work on developing positive thinking together and think of what they can DO when they feel anxious. Make a list and hang it up on the fridge!

Sometimes we could all do with someone to talk to.  If you would like to meet Louise for a confidential and non-judgemental chat about you, your child, or any other worries, she is available on Fridays 9-10am. You can call/text Louise on 07582310756 or email her at lalltimes.307@lgflmail.org  

Online Coffee Morning 30th April 2021

21st April 2021

 

Hello to you all. Please find a message from Louise, below.

 

LEARNING and WANTING to do the right thing.

Children develop their ‘inner compass’ every day. They learn what they live, primarily by the example you set and the family culture that you create.

How can parents help?

The most powerful way to teach a child a skill is to model it. When you treat others (including your child) with respect, when you apologise and when you regulate your emotions- then your child learns to do the same. Her inner compass will take shape from yours. In addition, your child constantly needs to make difficult choices so instead of telling him off and shaming him for making a “poor” choice, use it as an opportunity to develop that compass: help him reflect on how he feels and explain that we are all tempted to take the easy way over the right way: we are not perfect, but we can do better. In order to help your child, WANT to do the right thing, make sure your limits are reasonable and age-appropriate. Set them up for success so that they can feel good about being a person who does the right thing. Finally, help your child repair relationships following any damage and remember to stay connected: when your child feels you are on their side, they are more likely to WANT to follow your lead.

Sometimes we could all do with someone to talk to.  If you would like to meet Louise for a confidential and non-judgemental chat about you, your child, or any other worries, she is available on Fridays 9-10am. You can call/text Louise on 07582310756 or email her at lalltimes.307@lgflmail.org  

 

 

31st March 2021

 

A message from Louise

 

Holiday Survival Guide

Breaks from school can actually feel quite stressful for children, especially with all the disruption to the start of the year and their regular schedules and routines are again disrupted. As we head into a longer holiday, here are some tips on how to minimise the tears and maximise the joy at home.

How can parents help?

As always with parenting, it is most important to look after yourself first. Make sure your own cup isn’t full so you can stay calm. You can also let them know in advance what they will be doing over the holiday and remind them again every morning the plans for that day. Many children will also do better if you keep to some routine and schedule every day, to offer them some predictability. If you can, always include some outdoor or physical activity every day as it helps them to stay regulated. Finally, remember to do less and connect more!

Sometimes we could all do with someone to talk to.  If you would like to meet Louise for a confidential and non-judgemental chat about you, your child, or any other worries, she is available on Fridays 9-10am. You can call/text Louise on 07582310756 or email her at lalltimes.307@lgflmail.org

26th March 2021

 

A message from Louise...

 

Things to know about saying ‘NO’ to your child

We all wish our children would just comply when we ask them to do something. However, we all know that really isn’t always the case! Thankfully, it is possible to help children want to cooperate without resorting to yelling, threats or harshness.

How can parents help?

The most important thing to remember is that children only listen to us because of who we are to them. So be sure to keep strengthening your relationship: consciously connect with them before giving them a direction. You can also try to transform it into something fun and inviting! Kids will accept your limit when you first accept their feelings about your limits (sadness, anger, disappointment,…). Finally, children follow our requests when they feel they have some control in the situation: avoid power struggles by giving them a choice and some autonomy.

Sometimes we could all do with someone to talk to.  If you would like to meet Louise for a confidential and non-judgemental chat about you, your child, or any other worries, she is available on Fridays 9-10am. You can call/text Louise on 07582310756 or email her at lalltimes.307@lgflmail.org

19th March 2021

 

Message from Louise

 

Nurturing Family Connection: Dinner

Often, dinner can feel like such a chore, even a mission, that you just want to get through. However, studies show that having dinner together as a family is a top predictor for how well children will do in school and in adolescence. The ritual of sharing food with those we love offers children the security of belonging, being nurtured and a space to talk and share.

How can parents help?

Try to have at least a few nights a week when you can all eat together. Keep that space sacred, safe and positive and, most importantly, switch off the TV and all devices- including your own phones! It is helpful to keep dinner fun and playful and to engage everyone in preparing the meal and/or setting the table. Think of rituals you can put in place and try to make the discussions interesting for everyone. And the first secret is to keep the food healthy but simple: look after yourself and save your energy for connecting with your family.

 

Sometimes we could all do with someone to talk to.  If you would like to meet Louise for a confidential and non-judgemental chat about you, your child, or any other worries, she is available on Fridays 9-10am. You can call/text Louise on 07582310756 or email her at lalltimes.307@lgflmail.org

12th March 2021

 

A message from Louise...

 

Help your child build Emotional Intelligence


Returning to school some children can find it difficult to pick up from where they left off especially with friendships. It might feel like starting all over again or coming back into a welcoming group of friends, others may struggle to get along or to find other kids who share their interests. Some children have or make a best friend, some wish they could. Here’s a few things to help your child with their social skills and work through issues with friends or peers.
How parents can help:


Listen when he has peer challenges, which all kids do. If you tell him what to do, you imply that he is incompetent, and you aren't helping him learn. Instead, help him to clarify his feelings, and to problem solve
the issue.


Don't take sides when she fights with her friends. Listen to her views and empathize with her feelings but resist the impulse to demonize the other child. If you suspect that your child is being unfair, try wondering with her about the other child's point of view, but again be careful not to blame your child


Help her learn how to express her needs without attacking the other person. This is a challenge for all of us, so kids need our guidance, and to practice.


Make it a habit to acknowledge and reflect feelings instead of dismissing them. Often, we parents have such a hard time seeing our child in pain that we get angry at the other child. We say things like: "He's not a good friend to you. Let it go and find a new friend. Good riddance!" But that doesn't help the child at all. Comments that tell our kids to just get over someone they've cared about, or a hurt they've suffered, simply dismiss our child's legitimate feelings and keep the child stuck in hurt and anger. When you instead keep your own upset in check and empathize with your child's feelings: "Having your friend say something like that to you could really hurt." he gets to feel them fully. That might mean he gets more upset momentarily, but once he gets a chance to feel the emotions, they begin to dissipate. Once he feels better, he can do better problem-solving, whether that means talking with the friend, or ending the friendship.


Help him to think through various problem-solving options. Often, once kids work through their feelings, they know what action to take. “I’m not mad at Sam anymore and I miss playing with him. I’m going to knock on his door.” But if he doesn’t, help him brainstorm. Sometimes he'll need help from you to know how to say no in a way that keeps both his friend and his integrity.


If your child is having a hard time, consider what kind of support will help. For instance, some children
don't pick up on social cues and need help to learn specific skills, like how to join a group. Others don't listen to their friend's ideas, or physically get into each other's space. Observe your child as he or she plays with another child and see if you can pinpoint what is going wrong. Later, without blame or shame, act out a similar scenario with stuffed animals and ask your child what the characters should do. Make it funny to defuse any tension. Reading books about social skills with your child can also be very helpful, as long as your child feels you're partnering with her to support her, rather than trying to "fix" her. There are some good books for kids available online.


Sometimes we could all do with someone to talk to. If you would like to meet Louise for a confidential and non-judgemental chat about you, your child, or any other worries, she is available on Fridays 9-10am. You can call/text Louise on 07582310756 or email her at lalltimes.307@lgflmail.org

Children's Mental Health Week     

1st-7th February 2021

 

This years theme is 'Express Yourself'. How do you 'Express Yourself'? 

 

Expressing yourself is about finding ways to share feelings, thoughts, or ideas, through creativity. This could be through art, music, writing and poetry, dance and drama, photography and film, and doing activities that make you feel good.

It’s important to remember that being able to express yourself is not about being the best at something or putting on a performance for others. It is about finding a way to show who you are, and how you see the world, that can help you feel good about yourself.

 

Below are videos, suggested activities that you may wish to complete at home. There is no need to share them with school, do them for yourself. If you want to share your activities with others share them with your friends and family.  We will touch on this theme once we are all back in school again, this will give you an opportunity for children to share with their friends in school . The videos have links to YouTube so children please watch with a grown-up. 

 

Louise our Space Lady (from Ealing Schools Counselling Partnership) has created a video for us to share. It's been broken down into smaller chunks and it will be added to Class Dojos, during this week.

Videos from Louise - our Space Lady

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Louise has prepared a video talking about 'Children's Mental Heath Week' and the theme 'Express Yourself'. It has been broken down into smaller pieces and will be shared through the week. If you want to share some of your work, please add to Class Dojo's (put 'for Louise-Express Yourself'-Louise will look through on Friday) but there will be a chance to share work when we touch on this again, when we are all back in school.

Part 2-message from Louise

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Part 3 from Louise

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Part 4 from Louise

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Part 5 from Louise

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Children's Mental Health Week for Parents/Carers. These are suggested activities and there is no pressure to complete them.

Resources for Parents
#Encourage, Challenge and Support.#
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